NEWS

January E-Newsletter
Posted by: cnyha on Jan 15, 2008 in news

 
 
In This Issue
Staff Introductions
The Green Spot
Trigger Point Therapy
TemporoMandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ)
Fertility Yoga Class
Nourishing the Mind and Body with Food
Quick Links
CNY Healing Arts CenterMethodShakleeSeventh Generation

Earth911.org

Staff Introductions

Michele
Dobbelaere, L.Ac.

Michele graduated from New
York Chiropractic
College in Seneca Falls, New York with an M.S. in
acupuncture. She received her B.A. from Syracuse
University in both philosophy and psychology. Her special interests include
using Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat anxiety, depression, insomnia
and gastrointestinal issues.

Join Our Mailing List
CNY Healing Arts Newsletter
January 2008
Dear Lareina,We extend our wish of wellness to you in the new year!
 


The Green Spot.


Helpful tips to creating a greener life. We encourage you to try even one of these ideas that you’ll feel good about

  • Change your regular lightbulbs to compact florescent lighbulbs (CFLs), which are 70% more energy efficient. You’ll see the difference in your next energy bill! Simply changing out a single bulb a month will create an impact over the year.
  • Re-use your holiday greeting cards. You can use them as gift tags for next year, recycle them into new christmas cards, create ornaments for your tree or for use in a scrap booking project.
  • Photo greeting cards can be re-vamped for year round enjoyment by clipping off the bottom. Most will fit pefectly into a 3×5 frame.
  • Try a natural eco-friendly cleaner in your home. Many products, including those from Method, Shaklee (33% off cleaning starter kit online), and Seventh Generation (Coupons available online) can be purchased at Target or you local health food store.

 

Trigger Point Therapy
By John Cappozzi, LMT

Massage treatment for whiplash and related injuries.

The traffic light is yellow; you slow to a stop as the light
turns red. The driver behind you intends to stop, but misjudges the distance between cars. This results in a low-impact,
minimal damage accident.

Everything seems fine with you physically. However, shortly
thereafter you feel a headache coming on, your neck and shoulders start to
tighten up, and perhaps your lower back develops spasms. You are experiencing
symptoms of a whiplash injury from a low speed collision, which can occur from
impact as slow as five miles per hour.

It has been two days since your auto accident. You decide to
see your doctor, who puts you through a series of range of motion exercises, takes
a few x-rays, hands you a prescription for pain and sends you on your way. Over the next
six to twelve months you begin a series of doctor visits, physical therapy, and
possibly see a chiropractor. You are feeling some relief, but you still have headaches, jaw pain, low back tension, and
tingling down your arm.

When soft tissue is injured, micro tears occur within the
muscle fibers. During the healing process of these small tears, trigger points
develop. A trigger point is a firm, palpable, highly-irritable spot in a taut
band of muscle fibers or fascia, characterized by tenderness, referred pain,
and loss of range of motion. In other
words, it’s a “knot” that hurts.

There are many forms of treatment available to diminish trigger points:

  • Ice
    and stretch
  • Moist
    heat applied to the affected area
  • Ischemic
    compression (stopping blood flow to specific muscle fibers) followed by stripping and stretching the muscle
  • Injection
    of saline or local anesthetic, sometimes in combination with cortisone

Ischemic compression, followed by stripping and stretching
the muscle is one of the most effective treatments. It not only helps in reducing the trigger point,
but also restores length, strength, and range of motion. This form of trigger
point therapy is most often used by a skilled massage therapist, as well as some
physical therapists and chiropractors.

Therapeutic massage incorporated with trigger point therapy
can be extremely beneficial for whiplash and related injuries. When performed
by highly skilled professionals, results are usually noticeable after only one
session.

What to expect from a
typical massage session with trigger point therapy.

The session may last between 15 minutes and 1½ hours. The
therapist will use a variety of strokes and techniques plus digital pressure
(use of their fingers) on the trigger point, followed by a series of stretches.

We will have a monthly series on pain management in our newsletter. In the meantime,
call us at 315.671.5755 for more information about trigger point therapy. You will
speak to a licensed massage therapist and begin your road to pain free living.

 


TemporoMandibular
Joint Syndrome
(TMJ)
By Donald Clarke, L.Ac

TMJ refers to a
condition in the joint that connects the jaw and the skull. There is a wide
range of symptoms including an obvious pain, a clicking or locking of the jaw, or
the inability to open the mouth comfortably. In severe cases, headaches or
radiating pain may occur.

The most common cause
of TMJ is teeth grinding or clenching while sleeping. Additionally, the overuse
of the muscle from persistent gum chewing, or blunt trauma can also cause TMJ. This is a condition that affects millions of people each year. It is
easy to diagnose
, but often difficult to treat through western
medical treatment because TMJ shows a limited response to anti-inflammatory
medications.

An often overlooked,
but highly effective treatment is acupuncture. By placing fine needles into the
joint, a domino effect occurs within the connective tissue in and around the
joint. This loosens up the joint and decreases pain. Relaxation and stress relief are additional
benefits of acupuncture. A series of 3
to 5 treatments can often relieve a person of all TMJ symptoms. Simple changes
to diet and lifestyle further reduce the chance of TMJ complications. By eating
more chlorophyll-rich green vegetables, and practicing stress management, TMJ
can be treated more effectively, or even be avoided altogether.


 

 


Fertility Yoga Class
By Lareina Foster, MS

Fertility yoga is similar to regular yoga; the notable
difference is that positions which increase blood and energy flow to the
reproductive organs are used throughout the practice. Participating in
fertility yoga crafts a time and technique to focus solely on you. Yoga teaches
how to breathe energy and vitality into the mind, heart and body, creating an open and welcoming environment for a new life.

Yoga guides you toward being present in the moment,
closing your eyes, controlling your breath and feeling each part of your body.
During the session, you feel peacefulness and stillness. Your instructor moves you through positions that encourage the
release of stress and tension in your body. Your breathing is in tune with your
movements, allowing your body systems to regain balance, and promoting wellness
for conception.

Reducing stress positively impacts your ability to deal
with infertility treatments, and your life as a whole. Many women are
frustrated with their bodies while undergoing treatment. Tests, injections and procedures
leave them feeling negative and disconnected. Fertility yoga offers a positive
way to reconnect with your body, and leaves you feeling peaceful, empowered and
rejuvenated.

We offer Fertility Yoga on Tuesdays at 5:30. We invite
you to sign up for our class by calling 315.671.5755.


 

 


Nourishing the Mind and Body with Food
By Michele Dobbelaere, L.Ac

Chinese acupuncturists
and herbalists have a saying: “First food, then medicine”. This reflects their
idea that food can have as much of an effect on how we feel as an acupuncture
treatment. Food can contribute to the progression of, but also partially
relieve, certain conditions. The goal in traditional Chinese food medicine is
to have a balance of all flavors and properties, with a slight emphasis on the
organ that is out of balance. In Chinese medicine, each food has a flavor and
property. Acrid or pungent flavors support the Lung/Large Intestine and move up
and out. Salty flavors support the Kidney/Urinary Bladder and draw in. Sour
supports the Liver/Gallbladder and draws in. Bitter foods support the
Heart/Small Intestine Organ system to move energy down and out. Sweet and
bland flavors support the Spleen/Stomach system and can move energy up or drain
dampness.

What we would think of as sweet foods, like white sugar and flour are
not considered as sweet, just as food with no nutritional value. Sweet foods
are things like fruits and some vegetables. Each food also has an energetic
temperature (hot, warm, cold, aromatic) and many have specific effects on
certain organ pathways of energy throughout the body. This sounds complicated,
but your acupuncturist can help you plan a system of eating that will support
your particular health concerns after assessing and diagnosing you during your
acupuncture appointment.

For the upcoming Valentine’s Day
holiday, I would like to provide a sample menu that is balanced according to
the principles of Chinese medicine. This menu uses each of the five flavors and
supports the Qi (energy) and Blood (fluids) of the body without being overly
rich or filling, which drags energy down. Some of the items included are seen
by the Chinese as aphrodisiacs because they support the Kidney system that
houses our reserve energy as well as our reproductive energy.

Firstly, for a romantic dinner, try
to eat in a different place than usual. This simple meal can be eaten on
cushions on the floor or on trays in the bedroom. It is a light meal, but one
that should nourish your energy. Take your time eating, relax and enjoy each
bite and its different flavors and textures. The body is best nourished by food
when eating in a relaxed atmosphere, with no rushing to finish each course, and
taking a little time to digest before starting again.

The opening soup is simple miso
broth. If you are unfamiliar with miso broth, it is a traditional Japanese soup
that consists of soy, scallions and seaweed. The local health food or Asian
grocery store usually stocks miso paste and packets of the garnish and seaweed.
The seaweed can be easily left out if necessary and for the broth, noodles are
not added. This soup is nourishing to both Kidney and Yin energy.

The main course is also simple. It
is a rice dish with either shrimp and vegetables or beef and vegetables.
Vegetarians can modify the recipe by just leaving out the shellfish and adding
a non-animal protein like tofu or beans. Sweet rice (also known as glutinous
rice) can be found in the Asian food section of your local grocery. Sweet rice
is especially nourishing for the Spleen and Qi and is easier to eat if you want
to use chopsticks, since the rice sticks together. It is cooked on the stove,
or in a rice cooker. Both shrimp and beef support the Kidney meridian energy
and Yang energy. The shrimp dish combines fresh red pepper slices, chunks of pineapple,
peas or baby carrots and grated fresh ginger to make a colorful meal to eat
with the sweet rice. The ingredients are cooked in a sauce of water, a few tbsp
soy, a tiny bit of hot sauce or chili pepper, and a few tsp of cooking wine or
rice wine. A pinch of cornstarch can be added to thicken the sauce and it should
be sampled during cooking before adding the shrimp and vegetables to make sure
that it is not too salty or too spicy. Feel free to experiment with any
slightly spicy sauce that does not have a rich cream base or sugar base. The
ingredients that need to cook longer, like baby carrots and shrimp, should go
in first. The dish can be modified using beef slices briefly stir fried in
light oil, or onion, broccoli, baby carrots and small corn; then adding them to the
sauce. These particular vegetables and spices combine all the five flavors, with
an emphasis on sweet and Kidney foods. Hot pepper and gingerroot also increase
blood flow to the extremities and other areas. A glass of wine can accompany
the meal, or pomegranate juice, green tea or non-soda beverage.

The dessert is simple and sweet: A
dish of finger food instead of cake or ice cream. Use slices of seasonal fruit
like pear and apples, dipped in a little dish of honey. Honey is an especially
moistening food since it nourishes Yin energy as well as energizes. Enjoy.

 
Visit us online for more information about any of our classes, treatments or upcoming events at www.cnyhealingarts.com
Sincerely,

CNY Healing Arts Staff

 
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